Momentum

To make sense of this video – you have to DO what you see.

If you don’t you won’t understand the key fundamental principles and experience for Self-Development and Personal Transformation

If you have done the experiment it will make sense. If not…

17 Comments

  • sunny

    Reply Reply October 16, 2011

    can’t wait to try it!

    you looked like you may have dropped your keys or something out of your pocket. i trust you found whatever it was you dropped.:)

    i’m loving your work. thank you. s

    • Rob Ballentine

      Reply Reply October 16, 2011

      Hey Thanks Sunny:

      Let me know how you went on – Post your results here too – it really is quite an ‘eye openeing experience’ as Steve has just posted below!!

      Welcome great to see you hear.

      Rob

  • Steve Cowie

    Reply Reply October 16, 2011

    Hi Rob,

    1st Run – Unfamiliarity, Uncertainty, Viceral feedback of caution through ‘not knowing’, evidenced as a ‘brake’ on the run.

    2nd Run – More familiarity, more certainty, much less ‘braking’ in evidence, though more surprise when an unfamiliar obstacle (uneven ground) did catch me out.

    Certainly a different experience between the two!

    Advice to new runners – Check course for hard (and soft!) obstacles in advance.

    • Rob Ballentine

      Reply Reply October 16, 2011

      Hi Steve,

      Awesome – That’s brilliant.

      Yes there is a difference between the two and even more as one goes on. + If you videod it, there is a change in the way one runs too.

      Thanks Steve – Awsome man!!!

      What a Rebel that’s what I like to see – commitment to change -= taking account!

      Rob

  • Dave

    Reply Reply October 17, 2011

    I tried this yesterday.

    After a few minutes of sweating it out, I finally made the run.

    I didn’t run hard as it was quite scary. But I did it. wahoo

    There is a contrast between the two and I did improve my distance the second time round.

    Rob, this was a real eye opener to me and why I’m not getting my ‘shit’ done. I know why I stopped too but I don’t want to spoil your fun!

    Do it.
    Thanks

    • Rob Ballentine

      Reply Reply October 18, 2011

      Hey Dave,

      Great job – Ha thanks for keeping the spoiler safe ๐Ÿ™‚

      Rob

  • Sallie Crawley

    Reply Reply October 17, 2011

    Super stuff Rob.

    Will give this a go in the next couple of days and feedback. Although i won’t be videoing myself as i run like a loon anyways. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Due to life circumstances i have been looking for life affirming stuff. Just watching made me feel like it stretch me into taking risk.

    Cooool

    • Rob Ballentine

      Reply Reply October 18, 2011

      Sallie –

      Fantastic – no probs about the video

      I have to confess when I watched myself back on camera I thought – “Na I can’t put this on the net, What will people thinkj I’ll be the laughing stock of the PD world – however this was also that same ‘fear’ but in a different form”

      Then I thought – hey if it brightens someones day!

      But I don’t expect anyone to video it lol ๐Ÿ™‚

      Cool stuff Sallie ๐Ÿ™‚

  • Alistair Donnell

    Reply Reply October 17, 2011

    Hi Rob, what do you think to this article in light with what you are doing? http://www.wired.com/magazine/2011/06/ff_feedbackloop/

    • Nannette

      Reply Reply October 18, 2011

      Hello Alstair,
      I would love to have a type of feedback loop for my own state. I wonder if they still make those mood rings…

      Maybe an iPhone app…

      Nannette

    • Rob Ballentine

      Reply Reply October 18, 2011

      Alistair –

      This is a spot on article!!

      The two main aspects of this in relation to Self-Development from this article are…

      1) “The true power of feedback loops is not to control people but to give them control.”

      2) “The ideal feedback loop gives us an emotional connection to a rational goal.”

      And this is precisly what people will discover from this exercise.

      Brilliant find Alistair thanks!!

      The problem with so many PD courses books etc, is that they don’t foster this feedback loop in people, either enough or at all.

      The feedback loop is from a 3rd party. That to me is disingenuous to the whole notion of Personal Development.

      And so in the first statement a 3rd party takes away this control of self-development – it is no longer self rather, other.

      and in 2 it’s this emotional attachement (the unconscious) that provides this as the right feedback loop to have.

      Nice one!

      Rob

      P.S. Have you done the Run??

  • Nannette

    Reply Reply October 18, 2011

    Hi Rob,

    There were cows watching me in the adjacent field, so I was a bit self-conscious. We stopped at a park in a small town.

    First run: I felt a bit scared, I was concerned about falling. It seemed like I was running downhill.

    Second run: I felt better. The ground felt even this time.

    Third run: It seemed like there were shadows towards the end of the run, there was not a cloud in the sky. I wonder if I was sensing the large trees.

    Fourth run: Not a big deal, but still a bit of fear.

    I am really curious about sensing those trees.

    We went and used the swing set. I’m sure the cows are still talking about the blindfolded runner.

    Nannette

    • Rob Ballentine

      Reply Reply October 18, 2011

      Nannette.
      The Cows – I LOVE IT – MOoo was that Runner??

      (sorry couldn’t resist)

      Hey fantastic you did it four times – super cool rebel badge on its way!

      I don’t to say too much again – as this experience is really sooo valuable and I don’t want to give it away.
      (will let everyone know on Sunday what this exercise means in relation so the WHOLE PD stuff)

      Rob

  • Alistair Donnell

    Reply Reply October 18, 2011

    Thought you might like it. It’s giving me some ideas to work with. I haven’t done the run yet I was planning on finding a friend to do it with. I’ve got a day off tomorrow so i’ll film it so you can see, hear and laugh ๐Ÿ™‚

    • Rob Ballentine

      Reply Reply October 19, 2011

      Hey look forward to it —- the laughing that is ๐Ÿ™‚ I’m sure it can’t be worse than mine. ๐Ÿ˜‰

  • LoftyGit

    Reply Reply October 21, 2011

    After charging up the video camera battery and searching for a suitable scarf to wear, I went down to the park (not the local one as someone might recognise me!) and cruised around until I found a quiet corner. Then after setting up as much of the equipment in the boot of the car as possible I edged into the field to set up the camera.

    My main fear was that of stopping, taking off the blind fold, turning around and seeing someone legging it with the camera having a 50m start, that and looking an idiot.

    Being a tidy person I set up the camera on a painted line to see how straight I ran, did a quick explanation to camera, put on the blindfold and ran – carefully.

    I knew that there were no trees for some distance and I was doing a fast jog not a sprint, but the desire to stop soon built up to overcome my desire to experiment. So I stopped and turned round to do the return run. There was now the fear of falling over the camera, so it was wide and short.

    The second run was a lot more comfortable and I ran for further, though the camera shows I was thrown off course by a dip in the ground, and the return journey was a good length, but way off target again.

    So, my fear of looking an idiot was dispersed by doing it alone where I wouldn’t be recognised.
    The fear of losing the camera was unfounded (this time)
    The fear of running got easier with practice, though my inaccurate sense of direction was frustrating.

    Did anyone else feel how big the darkness of being blind is, and how much respect blind people deserve?

    Rob, Thanks for giving me a reason to try this. What’s Next?

    • Rob Ballentine

      Reply Reply October 21, 2011

      Brilliant explanation of this process thanks!

      I completely agree about the sense of depth of darkness when running blind – it is totally different to walking with your eyes closed.

      You make great observations about the pre-fears even before the run starts that we have to ‘overcome’ prior to doing any work.

      Great post!

      Rob

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